• A new generation of soybean cyst nematode is born every 24 days during summer. Many overpower resistant soybeans. All will cut yield potential.

    A new generation of soybean cyst nematode is born every 24 days during summer. Many overpower resistant soybeans. All will cut yield potential.

  • That's 3 to 6 generations every summer. And every dead female cyst can contain 250+ eggs.

    That's 3 to 6 generations every summer. And every dead female cyst can contain 250+ eggs.

  • The good news is you can successfully manage SCN.

    The good news is you can successfully manage SCN.

Take The Test. Know your numbers.

Managing soybean cyst nematode (SCN) involves more than just planting an SCN-resistant variety. You need to know your numbers. Here’s why:

  • Nearly all SCN-resistant varieties have the same source of  resistance: PI 88788.
  • SCN Populations are adapting and reproducing on PI 88788 — they’re becoming resistant to the resistance.
  • As SCN reproduction increases, yield decreases. root-illustration.png
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That's why the SCN Coalition recommends that you work with your advisors to develop a plan to manage SCN:

Test your soil illustration

1.

Test your fields to know your numbers

SCN resistant seed bags illustration

2.

Rotate resistant varieties

Corn stalk illustration

3.

Rotate to non-host crops

Treated seeds illustration

4.

Consider using a nematode-protectant seed treatment 

SCN OVERCOMING RESISTANCE. How it happened.

It’s similar to the herbicide resistance problem. After 20+ years of farmers using the same source of SCN resistance, nature is finding a way around it. root-illustration.png

Beat the pest. Actively manage SCN.

Iowa farmer Ron Heck has been successfully managing SCN for 20 years. His first soil test: 30,000 eggs. His most recent test: below detectable levels. Here’s how he did it. root-illustration.png

Featured Farmer: Ron Heck


 Past Featured Farmers

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 Take Our Quiz

Have you had your fields tested for SCN? Take the test to find your number.

Start Quiz

Reset Yield Potential. Why Management Matters.

Nematologist Greg Tylka has been studying SCN at Iowa State University since 1990. His research team documented steady increases in SCN reproduction on soybean varieties with PI 88788 SCN resistance in Iowa farm fields — and accompanying yield decreases — since 2001. University researchers across the country report a similar trend of increased SCN reproduction on PI 88788.

Unfortunately, almost all SCN-resistant varieties available nationwide have the
PI 88788 source of resistance. That’s why it’s going to take active management to drive your SCN numbers down and raise your yield potential up. root-illustration.png

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